The planet Saturn is famous for its rings: they are so large that our Earth could easily roll over those rings. It is not just one ring, but a whole set of rings, which are separated by 'gaps'. Mr. Cassini was the first who saw through his telescope that there was a gap in the rings; therefore it is called the Cassini division. It is this division I wanted to image, but in the beginning that was not easy: everything must be perfect.

The rings of Saturn
The C-ring is also called the 'crepe' ring

All my Saturn images in one
Please also visit my Planets


April 6, 2010 21:47 - 21:57 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].
Standard ToUcam Pro webcam in normal mode @ 10 fps during 2x5 minutes giving 6000 frames, Baader IRB filter.

Saturn with Titan
April 21, 2009 20:08 - 20:14 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].
Standard ToUcam Pro webcam in normal mode @ 10 fps during 2x5 minutes giving 6000 frames, Baader IRB filter.

April 9, 2009 19:51 - 20:01 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].
Standard ToUcam Pro webcam in normal mode @ 10 fps during 10 minutes giving 6000 frames, Baader IRB filter.

April 1, 2009 21:54 - 22:04 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].
Standard ToUcam Pro webcam in normal mode @ 10 fps during 10 minutes giving 6000 frames, Baader IRB filter.

March 17, 2009 22:48 - 22:55 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].
Camera: ATK16IC; 252 exposures of 0.007 seconds, Astronomik Lum filter.
Altitude: 43 degrees.

March 17, 2009 22:15 - 22:25 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm], ToUcam webcam.
Altitude: 38.5 degrees.

March 16, 2009 19:16 - 19:26 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm], ToUcam webcam.
Altitude: 23.3 degrees.

February 14, 2009 22:31 - 22:35 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm], ToUcam webcam.
Altitude: 25.5 degrees.

January 30, 2009 00:25 - 00:33 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].
Altitude: 23 degrees only.

January 27, 2009 23:43 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].
Altitude: 23 degrees only, and fog building up ...

March 31, 2008 19:50 - 19:53 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].
Standard Trust WB-5400 webcam, format 352x288 pixels @ 10 fps during 300 seconds giving only 1989 frames, dropped: 153 frames, no filter.

February 26, 2008 22:31 - 22:41 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].

February 10, 2008 23:00 - 23:05 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].

February 7, 2008 23:27 - 23:32 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].

February 4, 2008 23:19 - 23:24 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].

January 24, 2008 23:19 - 23:24 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 [focal length 2500 mm].

January 2, 2008 00:50 - 01:00 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].

January 2, 2008 00:05 - 00:10 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 [focal length 2500 mm].

March 19, 2007 21:54 - 22:04 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].

March 14, 2007 20:04 - 20:14 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].

March 11, 2007 21:08 - 21:18 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].


March 8, 2007 19:14 - 19:24 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].








The same image as above, but during post processing upsampled in K3CCDTools x2.

March 5, 2007 21:10 UT.
I took this image because I wanted to measure the Field-of-View of my newly acquired WO Zenithstar 80ED II in combination with an SC3 webcam
[To capture all the moons of Saturn I should image much deeper.]
The FOV is: 29.87 x 22.41 arc minutes, which is nice to know when determining which optics to use for a certain object. I have stored this information in my FOV table
In planetarium programs such as Megastar and Cartes du Ciel I can specify the FOV and superimpose a rectangle on the skycharts so that I can see whether the selected optics will be appropriate for the chosen object.
Imaging: William Optics Zenithstar 80 ED II APO, f/6.8 [focal length 545 mm], 10cm extender, Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter; SC3a b/w RAW camera.

March 5, 2007 20:29 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].

February 22, 2007 00:18 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].
Post processing: I compressed the whole AVI [2.7 Gigabytes] with VirtualDub [18 Mb] so that Registax 4 could handle the filesize;
aligned, stacked in Registax 4 [no upsampling, stack size 1500 frames]; final processing in Photoshop.

February 22, 2007 00:18 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].
Post processing: I compressed the whole AVI [2.7 Gigabytes] with VirtualDub [18 Mb] so that Registax 4 could handle the filesize;
aligned, stacked and upsampled 2x in Registax 4 [stack size 1500 frames]; final processing in Photoshop.

February 22, 2007 00:04 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].

February 4, 2007 20:55 - 21:05 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2x Vixen HQ Barlow operating at f/20 [focal length 5000 mm].

January 14, 2007 23:52 - 00:02 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Televue PowerMate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].

January 11, 2007 00:56 - 01:04 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2x Vixen HQ Barlow operating at f/20 [focal length 5000 mm].

Note: from this date on I present Saturn with North UP.


March 27, 2006 19:37 - 19:41 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Powermate operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].

March 23, 2006 21:08 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2.5x Powermate [first light !] operating at f/25 [focal length 6250 mm].

March 11, 2006 21:38 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2x Vixen HQ Barlow operating at f/20 [focal length 5000 mm].


March 2, 2006 21:29 UT.
Absolutely my biggest Saturn ever!
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 5x Televue Powermate operating at f/50 [focal length 12500 mm].







Screen dump of my preview screen.

March 2, 2006 21:03 UT.
Maybe my best Saturn of this apparition.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2x Vixen HQ Barlow operating at f/20 [focal length 5000 mm].

March 1, 2006 18:48 UT.
Please note the shadow of the globe on the rings.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2x Vixen HQ Barlow operating at f/20 [focal length 5000 mm].

January 31, 2006 20:13 UT.
Saturn with moons: yet another test with the Meade f/3.3 focal reducer on my Alt/Az mounted 10-inch f/10 Meade LX200 Classic with SC3 camera.
This time I used a custom made M42 ring to mount the SC3 colour camera on the focal reducer.
Imaging: LX200-10 inch, f/10 [Alt/Az mounted] with f/3.3 Meade Focal Reducer f/5.68 [focal length 1420 mm].

January 29, 2006 21:18 UT.
Saturn with moons: I am quite pleased that 14.0 magnitude Hyperion is clearly visible.
This image is just a first test for my Meade f/3.3 focal reducer as I wanted to find out the field-of-view for this new piece of equipment.
On my 10-inch f/10 Meade LX200 Classic with SC3 camera the Focal Reducer reduces the focal length from 2500mm to 1030mm and the Field-of-View is 15.81 x 11.86 arc minutes.

January 27, 2006 22:19 UT.
Saturn in opposition: the Earth is just between the Sun and Saturn so that Saturn is brightly illuminated.
As a consequence the shadows of the globe are now evenly divided on the rings.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2x Vixen HQ Barlow operating at f/20 [focal length 5000 mm].

Saturn with moons.
January 27, 2006 22:10 UT.
This is not a mosaic, however I had to stretch the histogram rather agressively to show the moons.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 [focal length 2500 mm].
Saturn is visiting M44.
January 27, 2006 21:29 - 21:32 UT.
Imaging details: 135mm SLR Photolens, Vesta Pro SC3a colour, Baader Infra Red Blocking filter

January 24, 2006 22:37 UT [3 days before opposition]
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2x Vixen HQ Barlow operating at f/20 [focal length 5000 mm].

January 23, 2006 21:10 UT.
I like the wide field sensation of this image.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 in prime focus [focal length 2500 mm].

January 15, 2006 22:16 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2x Vixen HQ Barlow operating at f/20 [focal length 5000 mm].

January 14, 2006 22:00 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2x Vixen HQ Barlow operating at f/20 [focal length 5000 mm].

January 10, 2006 22:45 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2x Vixen HQ Barlow operating at f/20 [focal length 5000 mm].

January 8, 2006 22:45 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2x Vixen HQ Barlow operating at f/20 [focal length 5000 mm].

January 2, 2006 22:16 UT.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 with 2x Vixen HQ Barlow operating at f/20 [focal length 5000 mm].

January 2, 2006 21:57 UT.
I like the 'wide field sensation' of this image.
Imaging: LX200, 10 inch, f/10 in prime focus [focal length 2500 mm].

March 26, 2005 19:33 UT.
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 3x TAL Barlow operating @ f/24 [focal length 3600mm], Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter; ToUcam Pro.

March 9, 2005 20:10 UT.
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 3x TAL Barlow operating @ f/24 [focal length 3600mm], Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter; ToUcam Pro.

February 28, 2005 20:54 - 21:02 UT.
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 3x TAL Barlow operating @ f/24 [focal length 3600mm], Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter; ToUcam Pro.

February 28, 2005 20:38 UT.
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 5x Powermate operating @ f/40 [focal length 6000mm], Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter; ToUcam Pro.

February 13, 2005 22:09 UT.
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 5x Powermate operating @ f/40 [focal length 6000mm], Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter; ToUcam Pro.

February 7, 2005 19:27 UT.
This Saturn was imaged and post processed under the wide open eyes of 2 heavily interested visitors: 9 year old Koen had taken his dad Rob to my observatory !
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 5x Powermate operating @ f/40 [focal length 6000mm], Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter; ToUcam Pro.

February 6, 2005 22:03 - 22:21 UT.
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 5x Powermate operating @ f/40 [focal length 6000mm], Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter; ToUcam Pro.

February 4, 2005 21:18 UT .
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 5x Powermate operating @ f/40 [focal length 6000mm], Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter; ToUcam Pro.

January 24, 2005 22:19 UT.
Saturn - with 6 moons visible - visiting galactic cluster NGC 2420.

January 24, 2005 20:25 UT.
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 5x Powermate operating @ f/40 [focal length 6000mm], Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter.

January 24, 2005 00:12 UT.
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 5x Powermate operating @ f/40 [focal length 6000mm], Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter.

January 22, 2005 00:24 UT.
Saturn 8 days after opposition: the shadow of the globe on the rings is already on the right hand side.
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 5x Powermate operating @ f/40 [focal length 6000mm], Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter.

January 15, 2005 22:55 UT.
Saturn 2 days after opposition: the shadow of the globe on the rings is still equally divided.
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 5x Powermate operating @ f/40.

January 13, 2005 21:40 UT.
Saturn in opposition with 5 moons visible.
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8 in prime focus, Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter; SC3a b/w RAW camera.

January 13, 2005 21:14 UT.
Saturn during opposition: the shadow of the globe on the rings is equally divided.
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 5x Powermate operating @ f/40.

January 13, 2005 00:35 UT.
Saturn is only hours away from opposition: there is almost no shadow on the rings.
I am pleased to note that the globe of Saturn is even visible through the Cassini division and the A ring.
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 5x Powermate operating @ f/40.

January 13, 2005 00:26 UT.
Saturn is only hours away from opposition: there is almost no shadow on the rings.
I am pleased to note that the globe of Saturn is even visible through the Cassini division and the A ring.
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 5x Powermate operating @ f/40, Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter; ToUcam Pro.

January 8, 2005 22:39 UT.
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 5x Powermate operating @ f/40.
First light for my 5x Powermate [in bad seeing].

December 19, 2004 22:56 UT.
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 3x TAL Barlow operating @ f/24

December 8, 2004 23:26 UT.
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 3x TAL Barlow operating @ f/24

December 3, 2004 23:38 UT.
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 2x Vixen HQ Barlow and 2x Photo-teleconverter operating @ f/32

My first Saturn of the new season.
November 24, 2004 00:53 UT.
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 3x TAL Barlow operating @ f/24.

The shadow of Saturn on the rings
This change of the shadows of Saturn on its rings is caused by the changing angle under which
we - from Earth - see Saturn with respect to the Sun.
Click here to view an animation of these motions.

March 17, 2004 19:37 UT.
There is a strange irregularity in the rings. I processed in different ways and it persisted; I assume however it is a processing artefact.
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 3xTAL Barlow operating @ f/24, Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter; ToUcam Pro.
March 8, 2004 19:36 UT.
TAL-2M 6-inch f/8; with 2x Photo Teleconverter and 2x Vixen HQ Barlow operating @ f/32.
Saturn.
February 26, 2004 19:55 UT.
Saturn.
February 26, 2004 19:45 UT.
February 23, 2004 20:29 UT.
The shadow of Saturn on the rings has moved up again!
I processed using two different procedures; it is interesting to see the colour differences.
February 23, 2004 20:29 UT.
The shadow of Saturn on the rings has moved up again!
January 23, 2004 22:13 UT.
I could not improve my image of December 9, 2003.
January 2, 2004 22:19 UT.
An attempt to improve my image of December 9, 2003.
December 18, 2003 23:00 UT.
Not too bad, but not my best.

December 9, 2003 00:32 UT: my best Saturn to date.
TAL-2M with 3xBarlow, Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter and ToUcam Pro.




This is a single unstacked unprocessed raw frame.
December 9, 2003 00:00 UT.
Saturn with 7 of its moons.
September 22, 2003 04:52 UT.
My first Saturn of this season and a nice test for my ToUcam.
TAL-2M with 3xBarlow, Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter and ToUcam Pro.

February 5, 2003 19:18 UT
TAL-2M with 3xBarlow, Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter and Vesta Pro.

February 3, 2003 19:28 UT
TAL-2M with 3xBarlow, Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter and Vesta Pro.

January 31, 2003 21:36 UT
It was a very clear night but alas, I made a big error: I used both a 3xBarlow AND a Focal Reducer 0.6, so the result is not what I expected..

January 8, 2003 22:49 UT
I think I improved again ...

December 26, 2002 22:45 UT
After several days of rain I was surprised to see a clear sky, so I imaged Saturn and while preparing for the next object I saw that the sky was covered with clouds again. Soon after that it rained again ...
Because of the bad seeing this Saturn does not rank high on my list, but it surely demonstrates the impact of seeing on an image!

December 19, 2002 22:23 UT
I have made a complete write-up about HOW this Saturn was imaged and HOW the post-processing was done.

November 26, 2002 22:41 UT
Saturn is now visible in the evening, which (for me at least) is much better than early in the morning!

September 30, 2002 04:41 UT
My first Saturn of the new season! I shot a big AVI of almost 2000 frames and am pleased with the final result!

February 10, 2002. Just before the clouds came I captured my best Saturn to date! The Cassini division is unmistakingly there, so I am quite happy. After the imaging session the clouds came in fast and soon after this the rain was hitting the roof of my observatory ...
January 9, 2002: same as December 22, 2001, but still with bad seeing .. (one keeps trying ...)
January 8, 2002: same as December 22, 2001, but again with bad seeing ..
January 4, 2002: same as December 22, 2001, but with bad seeing ..
December 22, 2001. Hey: this looks good! How come? Well; I collimated, and that surely helped!
December 10, 2001. And another try ... already a bit better. A word of wisdom: you only gain experience by excercise.
November 15, 2001. And yet another one ....
November 11, 2001. Another attempt ....
November 1, 2001. I was not a good record keeper, but since my first Saturn and with a lot of helpfull comments of the QCUIAG community I kept trying to improve.
I tried to use my 4x Barlow (this was hard, because my polar alignment was off ...so I put it aside for a while ...), changed camera settings, adjusted my polar alignment and was verrrrry cooooldddd ...

October 31, 2001. A big night: my first image of Saturn. Overexposed, but the rings are clearly visible and it is all my own! I was very happy: finally I was on the right track! The moon was blazing, but yet ...

Prime focus, experimental low profile eye piece holder
Camera: QCVC
Software: VEGA
Seeing: moderate (quite some turbulence)
Light pollution: urban environment (with a blazing full moon!)

Postprocessing: Astrostack (with the faint hope to be able to see the Cassini separation)

I took several AVIís one after another and converted these into a range of BMPís using AVI2BMP.
With Astrostack I autoaligned with picture 1, then another time with picture 0.
Then unsharp mask 3, which indeed sharpened up a bit.
Next deconvolution:
van Cittert 1, filter Sharpen 5x5.
Result: marginal, but I am not unhappy with the total result so far.
Final adjustments with Irfanview which I consider a nice and easy to use tool.