Amazingly enough: the apparent size of our own moon matches the apparent size of the Sun: the Sun is 400 times larger than our moon, but is also 400 times further away. And because of these matching apparent sizes we regularly can enjoy solar eclipses. No mere coincidence, but creation.

On May 31, 2003 I visited my good friend Peter Katreniak in Kosice, Slovakia. Very early in the morning we went together to a nearby hill top facing East to ensure a good view of the partial solar eclipse.
My arsenal: my newly acquired Maksutov, my brand new EQ-1 tripod and a freshly made Baader Solar Foil filter.
With this set up I attempted to image the eclipse, and I learned that - even with focal reducer - the field-of-view is not wide enough to make total view images of this event. And mosaics are not possible: it goes too fast ....
I really should have used my 2x135 mm SLR Photolens, but alas: I had not prepared a Solar filter for it.
But I am very happy with my first solar images and it was a great joy to work together with Peter, his wife Zuzka and their friends Kamil and Victor!

May 31, 2003 02:14 UT.
Peter Katreniak [right] and I getting ready for the partial solar eclipse.
Location: hillside, Kosice, Slovakia.
Imaged by Zuzka Katreniakova.

May 31, 2003
03:00 UT
May 31, 2003
03:01 UT
May 31, 2003
03:02 UT
May 31, 2003
03:02 UT
May 31, 2003
03:03 UT
May 31, 2003 03:17 and 03:18 UT.
While imaging the Solar Eclipse I noticed that suddenly new sunspots appeared on the screen of my laptop. Later it turned out that the sunspots were not really new ones, but previously were invisible due to the rotation of Sun and moon during the eclipse. But it was a stunning view!