Venus is the second planet from the Sun and the sixth largest. Venus has been known since prehistoric times. It is the brightest object in the sky except for the Sun and the Moon. Like Mercury, it was popularly thought to be two separate bodies: Eosphorus as the morning star and Hesperus as the evening star, but the Greek astronomers knew better: depending on it's position to the Sun it is either evening or morning star.
In the Bible Jesus Christ is the Morning Star (Revelations 22:16)
When you see the morningstar you know it will not be long before it will be brilliantly light.
And when Jesus comes back it will not be long before the end of times will be there and that everything will be as originally intended by God when He created Heaven and Earth.
Please also visit my Planets

The planet Venus is a highly interesting object: just like our own Moon Venus has phases.
While surfing the Internet I found this schematic diagram: it nicely explains the phases of Venus.
(Just click the thumbnail ...)

The phases of Venus in 2004
This collage consists of several images I captured of Venus in 2004, showing the phases of Venus.
It is interesting to observe the changing illuminated portion and the apparent diameter of Venus.

Click to enlarge

To the Venus Transit 2004 Page June 8, 2004: Venus transit!
To the Venus Transit 2004 Page

July 28, 2009 02:37 UT.
I woke up at 4:30 a.m., looked through the window of my bedroom and there was the Brilliant Morningstar: Venus !
Mouse in/out to see/hide the captions.
Imaged with my Nikon Coolpix 995 camera in auto mode.
January 20, 2009 15:07 - 15:14 UT.
Venus as Evening Star; collage of images captured through LX200 10-inch f/10 focal with Televue 2.5x and 5x Powermate at focal lengths 6250mm and 12500mm.
Current distance: 96 million km; Magnitude: -4.5; Phase: 0.481; Phase angle: 92.2; Elongation: 47.0; Diameter: 25.93 arc seconds.
January 20, 2009 15:05 UT.
Imaging Venus from my observatory.
You can just see Venus on my laptop screen.
Imaged with my Nikon Coolpix 995 camera in auto mode.
January 17, 2009 17:24 -17:57 UT.
Venus as Evening Star; collage of images captured through LX200 10-inch f/10 focal length 2500mm and with Televue Powermate 2.5: focal length 6250mm.
Current distance: 100 million km; Magnitude: -4.4; Phase: 0.497; Phase angle: 90.3; Elongation: 47.1; Diameter: 25.05 arc seconds.
January 17, 2009 18:00 UT.
As you can see I had to hurry while imaging from 17:24 -17:57 UT, as the clouds were racing towards me.
Venus - Moon Conjunction.
December 31, 2008 16:28 UT.
Venus and the 3 day 20 hour young Moon.
Separation: 2.8 arc degrees.
Imaged with Nikon Coolpix 995 camera on tripod.
More 'naked eye' images like this.
Venus - Moon Conjunction.
December 31, 2008 16:27 UT.
Venus and the 3 day 20 hour young Moon.
Separation: 2.8 arc degrees.
Imaged with Nikon Coolpix 995 camera on tripod.
More 'naked eye' images like this.

May 11, 2007 17:52 UT.
Venus imaged with handheld Nikon Coolpix 995 camera.
April 20, 2007 19:31 UT.
Venus in conjunction with the 3 day old moon.
Imaged with Nikon Coolpix 995 camera from static tripod; location: parking lot overlooking Monaco.
March 22, 2006 08:59 and 09:37 UT.
Venus as Morning Star; collage of images captured through LX200 and Skylux Lidl telescopes.
Current distance: 98 million km; Magnitude: -4.4; Phase: 0.480; Phase angle: 92.3; Elongation: 46.5; Diameter: 25.42 arc seconds.
March 22, 2006 09:37 UT.
Venus as Morning Star.
Current distance: 98 million km; Magnitude: -4.4; Phase: 0.480; Phase angle: 92.3; Elongation: 46.5; Diameter: 25.42 arc seconds.
Imaging details: Bresser Skylux Lidl scope 70mm f/10 [focal length 700mm], Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter; standard ToUcam Pro webcam.
March 22, 2006 08:59 UT.
Venus as Morning Star.
Current distance: 98 million km; Magnitude: -4.4; Phase: 0.480; Phase angle: 92.3; Elongation: 46.5; Diameter: 25.42 arc seconds.
Imaging details: LX200 10-inch f/10 [focal length 2500], Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter; Vesta SC3a colour camera.
March 18, 2006 09:08 UT.
Venus as Morning Star.
Current distance: 93 million km; Magnitude: -4.4; Phase: 0.457; Phase angle: 94.9; Elongation: 46.4; Diameter: 26.69 arc seconds.
Imaging details: LX200 10-inch f/10 [focal length 2500], Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter; Vesta SC3a colour camera.
March 15, 2006 08:56 UT.
Venus as Morning Star.
Current distance: 90 million km; Magnitude: -4.5; Phase: 0.440; Phase angle: 96.9; Elongation: 46.2; Diameter: 27.72 arc seconds.
Imaging details: LX200 10-inch f/10 [focal length 2500], Baader Infra Red Blocking Filter; Vesta SC3a colour camera.
July 28, 2005 10:54 UT. Venus as Evening star, imaged - in huge turbulence - at 12:54 local time:
midday on a hot summer day; temperature 30C with the sun blazing on my hot Newtonian telescope.
Current distance: 204 million km; Magnitude: -3.9; Phase: 0.844; Phase angle: 46.6; Elongation: 31.1; Diameter 12.21 arc seconds.
September 1, 2004 09:56 UT. Venus as Morningstar, imaged - in high turbulence - at 11:56 local time.
Current distance: 123 million km; Magnitude: -4.2; Phase: 0.576; Phase angle: 81.3; Elongation: 45.2; Diameter: 20.31 arc seconds.
Imaging details: Scope: TAL-2M, 15 cm, 1200 mm, f/8 Newtonian.
Camera: Nikon Coolpix 995 with DCL-28 adapter.
September 1, 2004 08:59 UT. Venus as Morningstar, imaged - in moderate turbulence - at 10:59 local time.
Current distance: 123 million km; Magnitude: -4.2; Phase: 0.576; Phase angle: 81.3; Elongation: 45.2; Diameter: 20.31 arc seconds.
Imaging details: Scope: TAL-2M, 15 cm, 1200 mm, f/8 Newtonian, with 2x HQ Vixen Barlow operating at f/16, Baader Infra Red blocking filter.
Camera: standard ToUcam 740K in black/white mode.
August 2, 2004 09:07 UT. Venus as Morningstar, imaged - in high turbulence - at 11:07 local time.
Current distance: 88 million km; Magnitude: -4.4; Phase: 0.410; Phase angle: 100.4; Elongation: 44.8; Diameter: 28.35 arc seconds.
July 28, 2004 08:44 UT. Venus as Morningstar, imaged at 10:44 local time.
Current distance: 82 million km; Magnitude: -4.4; Phase: 0.375; Phase angle: 104.5; Elongation: 43.9; Diameter: 30.37 arc seconds.
July 23, 2004 07:26 UT. Venus as Morningstar, imaged at 09:26 local time.
Current distance: 76 million km; Magnitude: -4.5; Phase: 0.338; Phase angle: 108.9; Elongation: 42.7; Diameter: 32.64 arc seconds.
July 21, 2004 07:47 UT. Venus as Morningstar, imaged at 09:47 local time.
Current distance: 74 million km; Magnitude: -4.5; Phase: 0.324; Phase angle: 110.6: Elongation: 42.1; Diameter: 33.56 arc seconds.
July 19, 2004 06:55 UT. Venus as Morningstar, imaged at 08:55 local time.
Current distance: 72 million km; Magnitude: -4.5; Phase: 0.307; Phase angle: 112.7; Elongation: 41.4; Diameter: 34.62 arc seconds.
July 17, 2004 07:07 UT. Venus as Morningstar, imaged at 09:07 local time.
Current distance: 70 million km; Magnitude: -4.5; Phase: 0.290; Phase angle: 114.8; Elongation: 40.6; Diameter: 35.75 arc seconds.
July 6, 2004 06:40 UT. Venus as Morningstar, imaged at 08:40 local time, as there was less turbulence at this time of the day.
Current distance: 59 million km; Magnitude: -4.5; Phase: 0.193; Phase angle: 127.9; Elongation: 34.4; Diameter: 42.60 arc seconds.
July 3, 09:54 UT. Venus as Morningstar.
Current distance: 56 million km; Magnitude: -4.4; Phase: 0.167; Phase angle: 131.8; Elongation: 32.3; Diameter: 44.56 arc seconds.
Imaged at midday during a short period between rain showers: heavy turbulence!
June 29, 2004 07:54 UT. Venus as Morningstar.
Current distance: 52 million km; Magnitude: -4.4; Phase: 0.127; Phase angle: 138.2; Elongation: 28.5; Diameter: 47.57 arc seconds.
Imaged before the sun became too powerful: less turbulence.
June 28, 2004 10:28 UT. Venus as Morningstar.
Current distance: 52 million km; Magnitude: -4.4; Phase: 0.119; Phase angle: 139.6; Elongation: 27.6; Diameter: 48.18 arc seconds.
Imaged at noon in high turbulence, with lots of passing clouds.
May 14, 2004 18:46 UT. Venus in broad daylight.
Current distance: 56 million km; Magnitude: -4.5; Phase: 0.165; Phase angle: 132.0; Elongation: 32.1; Diameter: 44.81 arc seconds.
May 8, 2004 18:54 UT. Venus hovering over my caravan; location: Lipot - Hungary.
Current distance: 61 million km; Magnitude: -4.5.
May 3, 2004 14:54 UT. Venus in broad daylight, captured between rain showers.
Current distance: 66 million km; Magnitude: -4.5; Phase: 0.266; Phase angle: 117.9; Elongation: 39.2; Diameter: 37.57 arc seconds.
April 26, 2004 14:00 UT. Venus in bright sunlight.
Current distance: 74 million km; Magnitude: -4.5; Phase: 0.325; Phase angle: 110.4; Elongation: 42.1; Diameter: 33.72" arc seconds.
April 23, 2004 21:00 UT.
The moon and Venus in conjunction.
April 23, 2004 13:12 UT. Venus in bright sunlight.
Once again I located Venus in broad daylight by using my setting circles.
Current distance: 77 million km; Magnitude: -4.5; Phase: 0.349; Diameter: 32.25 arc seconds.
March 27, 2004 15:06 UT. Venus in bright sunlight.
I could not see Venus, not even through my finderscope, so I first aimed at the moon and used my setting circles to find Venus.
Current distance: 107 million km; Magnitude: -4.3; Phase: 0.517; Diameter: 23.25 arc seconds.
Oslo, February 4, 2004 16:55UT

Yesterday afternoon it was cloudy in the Netherlands and today it is even worse: it is raining.
So yesterday I wanted to see if my friend Carsten Arnholm [Oslo, Norway] had clear skies
I used the private Nikon Coolpix 995 camera permanently mounted on the home balcony of Steinar Midtskogen, an amateur astronomer/photographer/meteorologist, who has been shooting the same field of view continuously (every 45 seconds) since mid June 2003!
Carsten explains: "the bright white lights you see in the middle background and to the left are from slalom skiing hills. Also very problematic further southwest are numerous unshielded greenhouses that light up the entire sky at night. I think we must be the light pollution capital of northern Europe."

Today it does not look good for Carsten (nor for me), but yesterday I captured (no, NOT imaged !!!) Venus hovering over Oslo: all I had to do is to make a screen print .....

I have lined up the Venus images of December 2 and 18, 2002 as well as of January 11, 2003, so that the differences become apparent.
The distance between the Earth and Venus has been increased by 43 million kilometres and although the phase has changed from 0.228 to 0.503 the magnitude has decreased by 0.3
Also the apparent size of Venus has decreased from 43.17 to 24.67 arc seconds, which is quite visible!.

January 11, 2003 08:58 UT. Venus in bright sunlight and heavy turbulence.
Current distance: 101 million km; magnitude: -4.4; phase: 0.503; apparent size 24.67 arc seconds.
Today Venus is at it's greatest Western elongation from the sun.
December 18, 2002 08:24 UT. Venus in the early morning and almost touching the chimney of my home, so I experienced a LOT of turbulence!
Current distance: 74 million km; magnitude: -4.6; phase: 0.356; apparent size: 33.64 arc seconds.

December 2, 2002 08:00 UT. Venus in the early morning, just over the roof of my home. As you can see Venus has phases, just like the Moon.
Current distance: 58 million km; magnitude: -4.7; phase: 0.226; apparent size: 43.17 arc seconds.


June 13, 2002 19:45 UT. Venus and the 2 [almost 3] days old moon.
Location: Chvalsiny, Czechia [camping site].